My network marketing Leads are the best way to follow the golden proverb that somebody must have dropped coming down the mountain, because when it fell, it hit so hard that everyone doesn’t think twice about it just being plan common sense. And I don’t know why it isn’t folded into every California cookie because it is the best way to gain a fortune. This proverb that needs much repeating is “Work smarter, not harder.”


I’m torn. I use Rodan+Fields but never considered being a distributor. Then a friend of mine introduced me to Jeunesse and got me fired up to be part of his team. I said “yes”. But now I’m wondering if the company is right for me because a) I read some negative stuff online about the company, the products, lawsuits, however the team is amazing! b) I actually really like what R+F has done for my skin therefore I feel I connect with the company more.
The Federal Trade Commission warns "Not all multilevel marketing plans are legitimate. Some are pyramid schemes. It's best not to get involved in plans where the money you make is based primarily on the number of distributors you recruit and your sales to them, rather than on your sales to people outside the plan who intend to use the products."[21]
The interesting thing that most people miss about the major connection between retirement and network marketing is that once you strip out the financial aspects, you get a very different picture.   Since the creation of Social Security back in 1935, people have been brainwashed to think that retirement is all about money.  That a successful transition from work-life to home-life requires the right dollar amount, asset allocation, and spending plan. But that’s just not the case.  There are plenty of people with substantial amounts of money saved for retirement that are completely miserable.
MLMs have been made illegal in some jurisdictions as a mere variation of the traditional pyramid scheme, including in mainland China.[10][11] In jurisdictions where MLMs have not been made illegal, many illegal pyramid schemes attempt to present themselves as MLM businesses.[7] Given that the overwhelming majority of MLM participants cannot realistically make a net profit, let alone a significant net profit, but instead overwhelmingly operate at net losses, some sources have defined all MLMs as a type of pyramid scheme, even if they have not been made illegal like traditional pyramid schemes through legislative statutes.[4][19][20]
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