I just started selling for one of the top 15 and I went in knowing that this was just supplemental cash and nothing that would support my family. I spend 15 minutes (mostly from my phone) a day on my business and am happy with what I’ve done thus far. If it covers groceries and some extras like clothes or shoes, I’m good. If I start to become even more successful, great. It’s my competitive nature to want to out rank others, so I find it to be more of a personal challenge than thinking I’m going to get rich and stay rich. I appreciate the article and the no BS attitude.
So to make it possible, you structured a kind of “payplan” or ways how you are going to pay your neigbors and relatives based on the number of people they’ve brought in or the group sales they’ve made. And by applying some MLM principle, you were able to plot a system that traces all sales from person to person down the line. Therefore, giving credit and commission also to the first person who initiated the effort.
You must believe in the benefits of the product or service you intend to sell if you want to have a successful MLM operation. This may require that you constantly purchase the product for your own use. Build your sales team with people who share your passion and enthusiasm. Hold regular sales meetings to monitor the productivity of salespeople to ensure that they meet the company's sales objectives. You may also have to participate in motivational seminars and travel frequently. So factor these into your schedule and budget. If you are not the best at public speaking, find a person within the organization who is a good motivator and public speaker to address the sales team. Create incentives such as performance bonuses and a higher payout for top sales people to keep your sale team motivated.
Working with your various leads should get you somewhere, or else you need to rethink your plans. If you find that engagement is still low after you try yourself to get leads that turn into paying ones, you should just buckle down and study on what you’re doing more. Anyone that wants to be successful has to alter what they are doing so that they can get more from the people they are working with. You really need to get this underway or else it’s going to end in you wasting time with leads that won’t pay off.
The FTC’s case against BurnLounge provides an example. BurnLounge argued that its participants bought product packages consisting of sales websites and music-related merchandise because they wanted to use the merchandise. When BurnLounge’s product packages were untied from the business opportunity, however, monthly sales of these packages plummeted by almost 98 percent. At most, actual demand was responsible for only a small minority of package sales, and BurnLounge was found to have an unfair or deceptive compensation structure. 
Kay, you don’t need a lot of money to buy essential oils, NOT AT ALL! Specifically now that distillers will sell directly to small businesses with very minimum amount, your $100 will buy you a lot actually. Averagely, your cost with MLM in a single bottle will be around 25x-30x more. So it is not the cost; but the business set-up (packaging, presentation, etc.).

I’ve been using these leads for over 2 years now and have built large organizations. Not only are the leads of great quality but the support is excellent. I use a simple six-step process to train my team. When you have leads who are all looking to start a home-based business, this is a very simple and duplicatable process. Cal Faber Victoria B.C. Canada – 

Most prospective clients are going to be found online because they are searching for related information and will make the purchase right away. These are the prospects that should be the main focus of any campaign that is being set-up by yourself in order to garner interest. The online world is where the most accessible market is and you are able to work 24/7 without even having to sit on the computer physically.
Thanks for this post. Very helpful. I do like direct sales; one reason for this is that it helps keep alive that age-old tradition of people interacting face-to-face (rather than mainly through texting and social media). For that reason, I think MLMs should target the lonely Millennials. Anyway, I was a member/distributor of Advocare for over 10 years and still miss the products and the activities in the company, now that I am temporarily out. I still plan to sign up again when I can afford it (long story–I’ll spare you). I am now involved in Melaleuca, and I must say in their defense that Melaleuca’s products are actually not overpriced. Because Preferred Customers are not only not expected, but also NOT ALLOWED to turn around and sell the products at the retail price, everyone pays the same low prices. (Granted, one can indeed go to the website and buy directly from the company if they do not want to become a Preferred Customer. Why would someone do that when the annual membership is only $19? Only if they do not want to commit to the minimum monthly requirement for Preferred Customers.) Public, keep this in mind! Don’t be fooled by the rebels who are selling old Melaleuca products on Amazon for way above the retail price!! You’re much better off buying fresh products directly from the factory, even if you pay retail price. Just sayin. My big question: What about Tupperware? I have been a Tupperware consultant for about 6 months, and I have found it to be extremely difficult to keep business going. The directors training me have said that Tupperware is the second most widely recognized brand name in the world, second only to Coca-Cola. If that is the case, why is it so hard to find people willing to host Tupperware parties? Why does it seem so hard to sell? Also, is it just me…Or, does Tupperware’s compensation plan stink?
I appreciate this comment. I’m a doTERRA gal. When I signed up I said I’d never sell. I just wanted to buy and use the oils. Then because of my love for them, people started coming to me for education and asking where they could get oils. So now I sell them. I’m not a sales person. I can’t bug my friends about stuff. But I’m growing this business because I truly believe in the products and use them every single day. I may not ever become rich from this and that’s OK with me. I won’t consider it a failure. Every person I help is a success in my book!
Great job on the top 25 MLMs. Really like what you’re doing for the industry as a whole. Your analysis is spot on. However, a closer look at retention rates for each company might give you another perspective on the value proposition of any given company. As a Doterra Wellness Advocate we are told by our corporate execs that we have a 65% retention rate with customers repurchasing the product within 3 months. And that if we based it on the industry standard of 12 months our retention would go up to 85%. I’m told that this is unprecedented in network marketing. So I’m believing that Doterra is succeeding because its selling a product that works and that users and word-of-mouth drive the business in the long run.
A downline distributor is a recruited distributor from whom the sponsor (the one who recruited them) gains commissions. Every compensation plan involves recruiting other distributors to help sell the company’s product. Some compensation plans provide higher commissions for recruiting successful distributors (quality over quantity). Other plans only focus on simply hiring more distributors (quantity over quality). Overall, downline distributors help sponsors gain extra commissions.
We have been accumulating this BizOpp Buyers file for a few years now.  So we have combined them all together to come up with a huge list of over 1 Million of our best Business Opportunity leads.  Each record has name, postal address, phone, email address, date, time, IP address. This list combines the scope and price of a mega database with the targeting of our bizopps seekers lists.
So to make it possible, you structured a kind of “payplan” or ways how you are going to pay your neigbors and relatives based on the number of people they’ve brought in or the group sales they’ve made. And by applying some MLM principle, you were able to plot a system that traces all sales from person to person down the line. Therefore, giving credit and commission also to the first person who initiated the effort.
Growing a MLM, is recruiting others who you hope to help find success growing their own business within your organization. However, the reason many do not grow their organization is because they are not comfortable following suit of their up-line. I would never ever pay for mlm leads for a few reasons. One, I am not comfortable cold calling, selling, pitching, begging, prospecting, therefore, I would be insane to think those in my downline would be. I would never do what I would not think that my downline could do, and asking them to put themselves into so much fear and discomfort, would make me untrustworthy. I totally agree with Sukhi’s post, MLM’s are based on trust. If you want to talk to people, talk to them, build a relationship, network with others.
I appreciate this comment. I’m a doTERRA gal. When I signed up I said I’d never sell. I just wanted to buy and use the oils. Then because of my love for them, people started coming to me for education and asking where they could get oils. So now I sell them. I’m not a sales person. I can’t bug my friends about stuff. But I’m growing this business because I truly believe in the products and use them every single day. I may not ever become rich from this and that’s OK with me. I won’t consider it a failure. Every person I help is a success in my book!
×